Decorative Concrete Stamping & Acid Staining | Epoxy Flooring |

An Interesting Concept of Concrete

Decorative Concrete Overlay

Concrete is an extraordinary material that is practical, expressive, and aesthetic all at once. From primal and formless slurry, you can transform it into virtually any shape that becomes a solid mass. The possibilities for creative expression are endless. You can grind, polish, stamp, or stain it. You can embed meaningful objects within it.

Concrete has substance and mass, permanence and warmth. It feels earthy, and is at home in both traditional and modern settings. It assumes forms that irrevocably touch our daily lives-bridges, highways, floors, walls… even countertops. Concrete is also surprisingly tactile. Cast and shaped, it can feel like stone rounded by the sea. Textured and colored, it can echo the patina of timeworn tile.

Concrete can also be used as a floor material with enormous creative advantages whether seeded, stained, stamped, broomed or diamond-finished. It can be a sole performer or play the supporting role to tile, mosaics, decorative aggregates, stone, wood, or metal. It is inexpensive, durable, noncombustible, impervious to decay, and also very effective for passive solar gain in the right application.


Decorative Concrete - What You Should Know About Cracks & Color Variations

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Repairing small cracks in Concrete

Clean out the crack with a wire brush to remove dirt and loose stones. Wash the crack with a concrete cleaner. Get commercially available nonacid concrete cleaner made by the same company that makes your patching compound. It is safer and more convenient than the large of muriatic acid masons might use.

Let the surface dry. If the crack is deep and it is in a floor, fill it partially with sand, leaving an opening about 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. Pour in the crack sealer until it forms a layer 1/4 inch deep. Let it dry overnight and then apply another layer. Repeat until the surface is flush with the floor. Do not overfill, apply enough patch material to bring the surface flush with the floor. If using caulk, smooth with a metal putty knife.

On deeper cracks, mix some sand mix according to the direction on the bag. Trowel it into the cracks, filling it flush with the surface. First, the patch on both deep and shallow cracks will have a watery sheen. When the sheen dries off, se a wooden float to smooth the surface and give it a texture that matches the rest of the concrete. If the existing concrete is very smooth, then smooth the surface with a metal finishing trowel.


Repairing Broken Concrete

Concrete Resurfacing Epoxy

Repairing small cracks in Concrete

Clean out the crack with a wire brush to remove dirt and loose stones. Wash the crack with a concrete cleaner. Get commercially available nonacid concrete cleaner made by the same company that makes your patching compound. It is safer and more convenient than the large of muriatic acid masons might use.

Let the surface dry. If the crack is deep and it is in a floor, fill it partially with sand, leaving an opening about 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. Pour in the crack sealer until it forms a layer 1/4 inch deep. Let it dry overnight and then apply another layer. Repeat until the surface is flush with the floor. Do not overfill, apply enough patch material to bring the surface flush with the floor. If using caulk, smooth with a metal putty knife.

On deeper cracks, mix some sand mix according to the direction on the bag. Trowel it into the cracks, filling it flush with the surface. First, the patch on both deep and shallow cracks will have a watery sheen. When the sheen dries off, se a wooden float to smooth the surface and give it a texture that matches the rest of the concrete. If the existing concrete is very smooth, then smooth the surface with a metal finishing trowel.